Category Archives: Books

Organizing a 2E Student-The Gates of Hell?

Hummingbird

End of summer is approaching.  Dread.  The hummingbirds will leave and the school buses will arrive, and this year we have to pay for them… 100 bucks per student to ride the bus.

The sight of school supplies piling up in the stores makes my tummy feel yucky.  We have exactly 3 weeks.

Can you say, umm… The Gates of Hell?

(How handy that WT took 4000 pictures of this sculpture, before I beat him to death with a baguette.)

The Gates of Hell

Guess what?  Funny thing… Rodin wasn’t exactly big on school himself and not everyone ‘got’ him.  Some of his most famous work was criticized and rejected because Rodin’s style and themes weren’t traditional.  Sound familiar?

Anyway, soon we’ll be meeting with Lily’s team at school to talk about our plan to support her executive function deficits and teach Lily more organizational skills.

I feel like I’m cramming for an exam.  I read for pleasure on the plane to Paris.  I just couldn’t bring myself to think about the start of school yet.  But now, I need to get down to some serious research.

I have a few books about organization I’ve started reading in preparation.  I’m looking for some really practical, concrete suggestions & tips that will get us from home to school and back every day.

I’m not sure I can make it through another school year like last year.  But I feel that, because of our mediation with the school district at the end of last year, we’re finally going to have some specific supports in place to make 7th grade easier on all of us.

Organizing from the Inside Out

Organizing from the Inside Out

Organizing from the Inside Out For Teens

Organizing from the Inside Out for Teens

Organizing Solutions for People with ADD

Organizing Solutions for People with ADD

The Organized Student

The Organized Student

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A 2E Wish List–Gangrene & the Common Cold

Shopping online tonight for Zoolander’s 9th birthday, which is coming up this week.  I know she’s tactile and likes things she can touch and, because she’s very visual and has mild dyslexia, she likes books with pictures.

Here’s Zoolander’s birthday wish list:

*Syringe ballpoint pens
*Astronaut ice cream
*Ant Farm
*Rare Earth magnet balls like Nanospheres, Magnet Balls, Buckyballs, Neocube, Cybercube, Zen Magnets
*Plush microbes-She especially likes Gangrene and the Common Cold.  (Who doesn’t, really?)
www.giantmicrobes.com
Gangrene (Clostridium perfringens)
Common Cold (Rhinovirus)

Who wouldn’t love the cuddly Common Cold?



I definitely plan to order a book that Corinna at birdwannawhistle recommended, a childhood favorite of her science-minded 2E husband, The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe.

Last year, Zoolander wanted stuffed peppers and a fruit bouquet for her birthday meal.  She hasn’t decided yet what she wants this year, but hopefully something easier than making stuffed peppers on a school night.


Zoolandia-The Sensory Eval Pt 2

I passed Zoolander’s Sensory Eval on to her school and to our private Occupational Therapist. Zoolander began seeing our OT once a week and our OT began working directly with the school district’s OT to implement some of the suggestions from the report.

Zoolander loves her time with our OT.  They usually start the session with some kind of swinging activity, followed by work on cursive handwriting.  Our OT noticed that Zoolander had a difficult time, even with cursive, because her letter formation is far from automatic. Sometimes cursive is supposed to be better for visual-spatial kids because it’s more fluid and artistic.  

The beauty of visiting this OT is that she’s wonderful and really gets my twice exceptional kids, plus she’s close to our house, but… insurance won’t pay for her services.  Insurance insists that we can drive 20 miles to the nearest OT who specializes in grannies with arthritis and who have no training in working with kids who have difficulty with Sensory Processing.  So, there you go.

Luckily, our OT understands the expense and gives us lots of ideas to try at home, plus she tapers off her sessions once she feels the child is improving.  The books, The Out-of-Sync Child: Recognizing and Coping with Sensory Processing Disorder and The Out-of-Sync Child Has Fun have lots of great info and activities.

It’s also very helpful that our OT works quite often with the school district’s OT.  That takes me out of the middle of things.  They talk. The school’s OT observes and then makes adjustments and provides any sensory tools that they might need in the classroom.

Zoolander now has a special balancing chair, which she says helps her concentrate because she can move around more. She is also allowed to use a laptop for written work, which she says makes writing much easier.

I know the team at school takes care with Zoolander’s placement in the classroom, making sure distractions are minimized.  They are also conscious of the fact that if Zoolander is fidgety, she may need a Sensory Break, which could just be running an errand to the office or erasing the white board.

Zoolander has shown improvement since these sensory accommodations were made, but I still felt that there was something else that was getting in the way of her learning.  So, I put her on the waiting list for a Learning Evaluation.


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